Kai Tirhage: a liar and a thief

WARNING! This guy is a thief and a liar. Avoid at all costs!

Full Name: Kai Martin Tirhage
DoB: 05/02/1981
Address: Flygradiogatan 22, 42134 Västra Frölunda, Sweden
Email: KTirhage@hotmail.com and flashbackalanballanflashback@hotmail.com
Phone: 0046735856636, 0046732506917 and 0046763198662 on record

Qwak is a fast-paced platformer developed by an indie game developer called Jamie Woodhouse. The first version of the game appeared over 20 years ago on the BBC Micro, and over the years it has appeared on a number of different platforms. About 10 years ago I purchased 2 copies for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance – one for me and one “just in case”. They weren’t expensive yet I knew the run would be limited so why not?

A few weeks back I came across the games while cleaning out so...

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Is the use of antibiotics leading to increased resistance in bacteria?

bacteriaThere has been a lot of coverage in the media in recent times about the rise of “superbugs”: bacteria that has become immune to even our strongest antibiotics.

Sensationalist headlines predict the end of the world as killer bacteria wipe out the human race, unstoppable in their march thanks to resistance acquired from exposure to antibiotics that are flippantly over-used by hypercondriacs.

The theory that is used to justify these headlines is that more we use antibiotics, the more quickly bacteria evolve to resist them, and the faster the drugs stop working. Basically, an arms race where biology is pitted against technology, and where biology will be the inevitable winner as technology eventually runs out of ideas.

 

But is this really the case?

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The fundamentals of writing a framework

In software engineering, a framework is an abstraction in which software that provides generic functionality can be modified by implementation-specific code in order to result in application-specific software.

So SOLID

A good framework adheres to the SOLID principles of object-oriented design. These principles are:

  1. Single responsibility principle. A class should do just one thing (and do it well).
  2. Open/close principle. A class should be open for extension but be closed for modification.
  3. Liskov substitution principle. Objects in a program should be replaceable with instances of their subtypes without breaking the application. See: polymorphism.
  4. Interface segregation principle. Many client-specific interfaces are better than fewer general-purpose interfaces.
  5. Dependency inversion princip...
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Switching from Windows to Mac OS

Windows to MacA Little Background

I’ve been using Windows since 1998 when my father purchased a laptop for me for my college studies which ran Windows 95. I learned a lot on that little machine and as the years went by I progressed through Windows 98, Windows 98SE, Windows 2000, Windows XP and Windows 7. I skipped Vista because – as we all know – it was terrible.

Fast forward to 2011 when I first started working at the BBC. The first thing I noticed in the office was that most people were using Macs – and not just designers, but management, support staff and developers as well...

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Drives not showing under “This PC” on Windows 10

Due to Windows 8 being possibly the worst operating system that has ever existed, when Windows 10 was released I decided that I would play with it for a while before taking the plunge and migrating from Windows 7. I purchased a brand new drive for the occasion which would allow me to keep my existing Windows 7 installation safe, just in case.

A few days into using Windows 10 (with all the privacy-shattering junk disabled), I decided that I liked it enough (or in some cases, didn’t dislike it too much) to stick with it, given that Windows 7’s support will cease in the not-too-distant future. So I re-connected my Windows 7 drive in order to migrate some application data...

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Visit Dolgellau sold

This is just a quick post to state that I am no longer the owner of Visit Dolgellau as the website has been sold.

I was finding it difficult to balance my time between work, this website, a number of other projects and having a life. With neither project receiving the attention that it deserved, it was clear that something had to change. So I decided to sell some projects in order to free up time for the others and I’m afraid that Visit Dolgellau was among the former.

The new owner, Kyle, is keen to run the website in the same manner so users shouldn’t notice much of a difference. He’s also keen to continue to grow it with more content and a larger directory, making the website even more of a useful resource for visitors.

I’d like to wish Kyle all the best with his endeavour.

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Spa Classic 2015 at Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium

My father and I have been to many a racing event including Le Mans, Silverstone, Nürburgring, Mondello Park and the Isle of Man to name but a few.

We’d never been to Spa, but this year that changed: we went to the 2015 Spa Classic in his 1972 BMW 3.0 CSL.

We watched numerous classes, ranging from Minis and Cortinas to historic Le Mans winners. The atmosphere was relaxed and the public were allowed to go pretty much anywhere, so we also got up close and personal with a number of the cars as they were being prepared – and some later repaired – by their respective teams.

A highlight of the visit was being able to take the car for a few laps around the circuit. Although the 1972 CSL was fast for its day, clearly it wasn’t going to be much competition for new Porsches and Vipers...

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The 4 Good Things

The BBC’s Future Media department promotes the use of four key principles across its engineering teams, known as “The 4 Good Things”.

The interpretation of these principles tends to vary a little across each team, but generally speaking they provide a consistent approach to software development across a number of different projects, platforms and languages.

Here are those four principles along with my personal interpretations.

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Why Visit Dolgellau is written in English (and not Welsh)

Around once a month or so I receive an email or a message on Facebook asking me why Visit Dolgellau is written in English and not Welsh. It’s a tourist-focused website that I set up last year to promote my home town and the surrounding area.

Some seem to think that it’s an Assembly-backed website (which I take as a compliment, given the website’s humble background!) and are curious as to why it isn’t bilingual as a matter of course like the others. But others are clearly nationalists who simply hate anything that isn’t Welsh and this post is intended for them.

1) The role of Visit Dolgellau is to promote Dolgellau and the wider area as a tourist destination. In general, people who visit Wales tend not to be Welsh (because Welsh people already live here).

2) The website’s analytics da...

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Visit Dolgellau

Although I live in Manchester now, originally I’m from a little town in Wales called Dolgellau. Dolgellau is a market town in Gwynedd, north-west Wales, and is set in the southern part of
the Snowdonia National Park at the foot of the Cadair Idris mountain range. It’s a beautiful place – a fact that is only made all the more apparent now that I live in a city – and whenever I show anyone any photos I am always told how lucky I was to have grown up with such surroundings.

Back in 2004, a graphic designer colleague and I were asked by the Partnership – a guild of local businesses basically – to develop a website for the town. We enthusiastically accepted the challenge but soon discovered that politics and conflicting ideas within the Partnership made any kind of progress extremely difficult...

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